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TAKING PERSONAL INVENTORY

Audio Version

In the early days the thought of having to take a personal inventory everytime I breathed, in case I was wrong or rude, made my future look dark and bleak. Is this what is called sober living?

Of course not, what this Step was doing for me was bringing all the knowledge I had picked up on my journey on the road and through the Steps to a happy and sober life.

Continuing to take a personal inventory is a way of constantly sweeping the path ahead of me, ensuring that whatever I enter into in my daily business and contact with other people, I do with complete honesty and humility. If I am wrong promptly I admit it and if I am right (which I am periodically) I don't start to crow about it.

One of the benefits of being retired is the periods of time that I can be on my own, not antisocial, not trying to avoid jobs that are flowing from she-who-will-be-obeyed, just those moments that freedom from workday problems allow.

I start my day not with any lengthy ritual but just a simple reminder that I am an alcoholic and today I don't need drink to get me through. This is followed by a daily voluntary task that allows me and my dog a quiet walk along the promenade and for my head to bring up events past and recent to see how I can make amends.

My gloomy start to this contribution to Share is wrong in one sense; continued taking of my personal inventory hasn't made my life dark and bleak. Quite the opposite. My life is colourful and happy; this is what I call a sober life, warts and all.

These Steps are an education in life and for life and like any good education it does not have an ending. I am in my 25th year of continuous sobriety and I am still surprised and amazed at just how much more work I have to put in to keep my sobriety continuous.

Walking with my dog and Step Ten is one sure way to keep my personal inventory up-to-date. Happy days.


PETER R,
Colwyn Bay